Anaerobic Threshold Prediction Using the OMNI-Walk/Run Scale in Long-Distance Runners: A Preliminary Study

in International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
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Purpose: To identify the anaerobic threshold through the lactate threshold determined by Dmax and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) threshold by Dmax and to evaluate the agreement and correlation between lactate threshold determined by Dmax and RPE threshold by Dmax during an incremental test performed on the treadmill in long-distance runners. Methods: A total of 16 long-distance runners volunteered to participate in the study. Participants performed 2 treadmill incremental tests for the collection of blood lactate concentrations and RPE separated by a 48-hour interval. The incremental test started at 8 km·h−1, increasing by 1.2 km·h−1 every third minute until exhaustion. During each stage of the incremental test, there were pauses of 30 seconds for the collection of blood lactate concentration and RPE. Results: No significant difference was found between methods lactate threshold determined by Dmax and RPE threshold by Dmax methods (P = .664). In addition, a strong correlation (r = .91) and agreement through Bland–Altman plot analysis were found. Conclusions: The study demonstrated that it is possible to predict anaerobic threshold from the OMNI-walk/run scale curve through a single incremental test on the treadmill. However, further studies are needed to evaluate the reproducibility and objectivity of the OMNI-walk/run scale for anaerobic threshold determination.

Campos, Vianna, Souza, Novaes, and Leitão are with the Postgraduate Program of the Faculty of Physical Education and Sports of the University of Juiz de Fora, Brazil. Campos, Guimarães, and Silva are with the Study Group and Research in Neuromuscular Responses, University of Lavras, Lavras, Brazil. Guimarães is also with Human Movement and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of São Paulo, Santos, Brazil. Domínguez is with the Faculty of Health Sciences, Isabel I University, Burgos, Spain. Novaes is also with the Postgraduate Program of Physical Education of the University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Leitão is also with the Superior School of Education of Polytechnic Inst of Setubal, Setubal, Portugal. Reis is with the Center for Research in Sports Sciences, Health Sciences and Human Development, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, Vila Real, Portugal. Campos is also with the Dept of Physical Education, University of Lavras, Lavras, Brazil.

Campos (reiclauy@hotmail.com) is corresponding author.
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