Weekly Training Demands Increase, but Game Demands Remain Consistent Across Early, Middle, and Late Phases of the Regular Season in Semiprofessional Basketball Players

in International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance

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Markus N.C. Williams
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Jordan L. Fox
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Cody J. O’Grady
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Samuel Gardner
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Vincent J. Dalbo
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Aaron T. Scanlan
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Purpose: To compare weekly training, game, and overall (training and games) demands across phases of the regular season in basketball. Methods: Seven semiprofessional, male basketball players were monitored during all on-court team-based training sessions and games during the regular season. External monitoring variables included PlayerLoad and inertial movement analysis events per minute. Internal monitoring variables included a modified summated heart rate zones model calculated per minute and rating of perceived exertion. Linear mixed models were used to compare training, game, and overall demands between 5-week phases (early, middle, and late) of the regular season with significance set at P ≤ .05. Effect sizes were calculated between phases and interpreted as: trivial, <0.20; small, 0.20 to 0.59; moderate, 0.60 to 1.19; large, 1.20 to 1.99; very large, ≥2.00. Results: Greater (P > .05) overall inertial movement analysis events (moderate–very large) and rating of perceived exertion (moderate) were evident in the late phase compared with earlier phases. During training, more accelerations were evident in the middle (P = .01, moderate) and late (P = .05, moderate) phases compared with the early phase, while higher rating of perceived exertion (P = .04, moderate) was evident in the late phase compared with earlier phases. During games, nonsignificant, trivial–small differences in demands were apparent between phases. Conclusions: Training and game demands should be interpreted in isolation and combined given overall player demands increased as the season progressed, predominantly due to modifications in training demands given the stability of game demands. Periodization strategies administered by coaching staff may have enabled players to train at greater intensities late in the season without compromising game intensity.

Williams is with Eleiko, Halmstad, Sweden. Fox, O’Grady, Dalbo, and Scanlan are with the Human Exercise and Training Laboratory, School of Health, Medical and Applied Sciences, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, QLD, Australia. Gardner is with the Dept of Strength and Conditioning, United States Olympic and Paralympic Committee, Colorado Springs, CO, USA.

Scanlan (a.scanlan@cqu.edu.au) is corresponding author.
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