Restricted access

Purchase article

USD  $24.95

Student 1 year subscription

USD  $107.00

1 year subscription

USD  $142.00

Student 2 year subscription

USD  $203.00

2 year subscription

USD  $265.00

Purpose:

The aim of this study was to develop a laboratory-based treadmill simulation of the on-course physiological demands of an 18-hole round of golf and to identify the underlying physiological responses.

Methods:

Eight amateur golfers completed a round of golf during which heart rate (HR), steps taken, and global positioning system (GPS) data were assessed. The GPS data were used to create a simulated discontinuous round on a treadmill. Steps taken and HR were recorded during the simulated round.

Results:

During the on-course round, players covered a mean (±SD) of 8,251 ± 450 m, taking 12,766 ± 1,530 steps. The mean exercise intensity during the on-course round was 31.4 ± 9.3% of age-predicted heart rate reserve (%HRR) or 55.6 ± 4.4% of age-predicted maximum HR (%HRmax). There were no significant differences between the simulated round and the on-course round for %HRR (P = .537) or %HR max (P = .561) over the entire round or for each individual hole. Furthermore, there were no significant differences between the two rounds for steps taken. Typical error values for steps taken, HR, %HRmax, and %HRR were 1,083 steps, ±7.6 b·min-1, ±4.5%, and ±8.1%, respectively.

Conclusion:

Overall, the simulated round of golf successfully recreated the demands of an on-course round. This simulated round could be used as a research tool to assess the extent of fatigue during a round of golf or the impact of various interventions on golfers.

Hayes is with the Division of Sport Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK. Van Paridon is with the Human Energetics and Performance Centre, Unit for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK. French is with the English Institute of Sport, Gateshead, Tyne and Wear, UK. Thomas is with the Division of Sport Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK. Gordon is with the Human Energetics and Performance Centre, Unit for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK.