Relationships Between Triathlon Performance and Pacing Strategy During the Run in an International Competition

in International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
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Purpose:

The purpose of the present study was to examine relationships between athlete’s pacing strategies and running performance during an international triathlon competition.

Methods:

Running split times for each of the 107 finishers of the 2009 European Triathlon Championships (42 females and 65 males) were determined with the use of a digital synchronized video analysis system. Five cameras were placed at various positions of the running circuit (4 laps of 2.42 km). Running speed and an index of running speed variability (IRSVrace) were subsequently calculated over each section or running split.

Results:

Mean running speed over the frst 1272 m of lap 1 was 0.76 km-h–1 (+4.4%) and 1.00 km-h–1 (+5.6%) faster than the mean running speed over the same section during the three last laps, for females and males, respectively (P < .001). A significant inverse correlation was observed between RSrace and IRSVrace for all triathletes (females r = -0.41, P = .009; males r = -0.65, P = .002; and whole population -0.76, P = .001). Females demonstrated higher IRSVrace compared with men (6.1 ± 0.5 km-h–1 and 4.0 ± 1.4 km-h–1, for females and males, respectively, P = .001) due to greater decrease in running speed over uphill sections.

Conclusions:

Pacing during the run appears to play a key role in high-level triathlon performance. Elite triathletes should reduce their initial running speed during international competitions, even if high levels of motivation and direct opponents lead them to adopt an aggressive strategy.

Yann Le Meur is with the Research Department, Laboratory of Biomechanics and Physiology, National Institute of Sport, Expertise and Performance, Paris, France, and the Laboratory of Physiological Adaptations, Motor Performance and Health, University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Nice, France. Thierry Bernard is with the Laboratory of Physiological Adaptations, Motor Performance and Health, University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Nice, France, and with HANDIBIO EA 4322, University of South Toulon-Var, La Garde, France. Sylvain Dorel is with the Research Department, Laboratory of Biomechanics and Physiology, National Institute of Sport, Expertise and Performance, Paris, France. Chris R. Abbiss is with the School of Exercise, Biomedical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Australia; the Department of Physiology, Australian Institute of Sport, Belconnen, ACT, Australia; and the Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Belmont, VIC, Australia.Gérard Honnorat is with the French Federation of Triathlon, Saint Denis-La Plaine, France. Jeanick Brisswalter is with the Laboratory of Physiological Adaptations, Motor Performance and Health, University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Nice, France. Christophe Hausswirth is with the Research Department, Laboratory of Biomechanics and Physiology, National Institute of Sport, Expertise and Performance, Paris, France.