The Effect of Cluster Loading on Force, Velocity, and Power During Ballistic Jump Squat Training

in International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Restricted access

Purchase article

USD  $24.95

Student 1 year subscription

USD  $107.00

1 year subscription

USD  $142.00

Student 2 year subscription

USD  $203.00

2 year subscription

USD  $265.00

Purpose:

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of set structure, in terms of repetition workrest ratios on force, velocity, and power during jump squat training.

Methods:

Twenty professional and semiprofessional rugby players performed training sessions comprising four sets of 6 repetitions of a jump squat using four different set configurations. The first involved a traditional configuration (TR) of 4 × 6 repetitions with 3 min of rest between sets, the second (C1) 4 × 6 × singles (1 repetition) with 12 s of rest between repetitions, the third (C2) 4x3 × doubles (2 repetitions) with 30 s of rest between pairs, and the third (C3) 4 × 2 × triples (3 repetitions) with 60 s of rest between triples. A spreadsheet for the analysis of controlled trials that calculated the P-value, and percent difference and Cohen’s effect size from log-transformed data was used to investigate differences in repetition force, velocity, and power profiles among configurations.

Results:

Peak power was significantly lower (P < .05) for the TR condition when compared with C1 and C3 for repetition 4, and all cluster configurations for repetitions 5 and 6. Peak velocity was significantly lower (P < .05) for the TR condition compared with C3 at repetition 4, significantly lower compared with C2 and C3 at repetition 5, and significantly lower compared with all cluster conditions for repetition 6.

Conclusions:

Providing inter-repetition rest during a traditional set of six repetitions can attenuate decreases in power and velocity of movement through the set.

Keir T. Hansen and Michael J. Newton are with the School of Exercise, Biomedical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA, Australia. John B. Cronin is with the School of Exercise, Biomedical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA, Australia, and with Sports Performance Research Institute New Zealand, AUT University, Auckland, New Zealand.