Effect of Warm-Up and Precooling on Pacing During a 15-km Cycling Time Trial in the Heat

in International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance

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Koen Levels
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Lennart P.J. Teunissen
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Arnold de Haan
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Jos J. de Koning
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Bernadet van Os
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Hein A.M. Daanen
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Purpose:

The best way to apply precooling for endurance exercise in the heat is still unclear. The authors analyzed the effect of different preparation regimens on pacing during a 15-km cycling time trial in the heat.

Methods:

Ten male subjects completed four 15-km time trials (30°C), preceded by different preparation regimes: 10 min cycling (WARM-UP), 30 min scalp cooling of which 10 min was cycling (SC+WARM-UP), ice-slurry ingestion (ICE), and ice slurry ingestion + 30 min scalp cooling (SC+ICE).

Results:

No differences were observed in finish time and mean power output, although power output was lower for WARM-UP than for SC+ICE during km 13–14 (17 ± 16 and 19 ± 14 W, respectively) and for ICE during km 13 (16 ± 16 W). Rectal temperature at the start of the time trial was lower for both ICE conditions (~36.7°C) than both WARMUP conditions (~37.1°C) and remained lower during the first part of the trial. Skin temperature and thermal sensation were lower at the start for SC+ICE.

Conclusions:

The preparation regimen providing the lowest body-heat content and sensation of coolness at the start (SC+ICE) was most beneficial for pacing during the latter stages of the time trial, although overall performance did not differ.

The authors are with the MOVE Research Inst Amsterdam, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Levels, Teunissen, and Daanen are also with TNO, Behavioral and Societal Sciences, Soesterberg, The Netherlands. de Haan is also with the Inst for Biomedical Research into Human Movement and Health, Manchester Metropolitan University. de Koning is also with the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse.

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