Normalization of Early Isometric Force Production as a Percentage of Peak Force During Multijoint Isometric Assessment

in International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
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Purpose: To determine the reliability of early force production (50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 ms) relative to peak force (PF) during an isometric mid-thigh pull and to assess the relationships between these variables. Methods: Male collegiate athletes (N = 29; age 21.1 [2.9] y, height 1.71 [0.07] m, body mass 71.3 [13.6] kg) performed isometric mid-thigh pulls during 2 separate testing sessions. Net PF and net force produced at each epoch were calculated. Within- and between-session reliabilities were determined using intraclass correlation coefficients and coefficient of variation percentages. In addition, Pearson correlation coefficients and coefficient of determination were calculated to examine the relationships between PF and time-specific force production. Results: Net PF and time-specific force demonstrated very high to almost perfect reliability both within and between sessions (intraclass correlation coefficients .82–.97; coefficient of variation percentages 0.35%–1.23%). Similarly, time-specific force expressed as a percentage of PF demonstrated very high to almost perfect reliability both within and between sessions (intraclass correlation coefficients .76–.86; coefficient of variation percentages 0.32%–2.51%). Strong to nearly perfect relationships (r = .615–.881) exist between net PF and time-specific net force, with relationships improving over longer epochs. Conclusion: Based on the smallest detectable difference, a change in force at 50 milliseconds expressed relative to PF > 10% and early force production (100, 150, 200, and 250 ms) expressed relative to PF of >2% should be considered meaningful. Expressing early force production as a percentage of PF is reliable and may provide greater insight into the adaptations to the previous training phase than PF alone.

Comfort, Dos’Santos, Jones, McMahon, and Suchomel are with the Directorate of Sport, Exercise and Physiotherapy, University of Salford, Salford, Greater Manchester, United Kingdom. Comfort is also with the Inst for Sport, Physical Activity & Leisure, Carnegie School of Sport, Leeds Beckett University, Leeds, United Kingdom. Suchomel is also with the Dept of Human Movement Sciences, Carroll University, Waukesha, WI, USA. Bazyler and Stone are with the Centre of Excellence for Sport Science and Coach Education, Dept of Exercise and Sport Science, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN, USA.

Comfort (p.comfort@salford.ac.uk) is corresponding author.
International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
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