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Purpose: To identify the bar velocities that optimize power output in the barbell hip thrust exercise. Methods: A total of 40 athletes from 2 sports disciplines (30 track-and-field sprinters and jumpers and 10 rugby union players) participated in this study. Maximum bar-power outputs and their respective bar velocities were assessed in the barbell hip thrust exercise. Athletes were divided, using a median split analysis, into 2 groups according to their bar-power outputs in the barbell hip thrust exercise (“higher” and “lower” power groups). The magnitude-based inferences method was used to analyze the differences between groups in the power and velocity outcomes. To assess the precision of the bar velocities for determining the maximum power values, the coefficient of variation (CV%) was also calculated. Results: Athletes achieved the maximum power outputs at a mean velocity, mean propulsive velocity, and peak velocity of 0.92 (0.04) m·s−1 (CV: 4.1%), 1.02 (0.05) m·s−1 (CV: 4.4%), and 1.72 (0.14) m·s−1 (CV: 8.4%), respectively. No meaningful differences were observed in the optimum bar velocities between higher and lower power groups. Conclusions: Independent of the athletes’ power output and bar-velocity variable, the optimum power loads frequently occur at very close bar velocities.

Loturco, Kobal, and Pereira are with the NAR—Nucleus of High Performance in Sport, São Paulo, Brazil. Loturco is also with the Department of Human Movement Sciences, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazi; and with the University of South Wales, Pontypridd, Wales, United Kingdom. Suchomel is with the Dept. of Human Movement Sciences, Carroll University, Waukesha, WI, USA. Bishop is with the Faculty of Science and Technology, London Sports Inst., Middlesex University, London, United Kingdom. McGuigan is with the Sports Performance Research Inst. New Zealand (SPRINZ), Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand and with the School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia.

Loturco (irineu.loturco@terra.com.br) is corresponding author.
International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
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