No Influence of Acute Moderate Normobaric Hypoxia on Performance and Blood Lactate Concentration Responses to Repeated Wingates

in International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
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Background: Training in hypoxia versus normoxia often induces larger physiological adaptations, while this does not always translate into additional performance benefits. A possible explanation is a reduced oxygen flux, negatively affecting training intensity and/or volume (decreasing training stimulus). Repeated Wingates (RW) in normoxia is an efficient training strategy for improving both physiological parameters and exercise capacity. However, it remains unclear whether the addition of hypoxia has a detrimental effect on RW performance. Purpose: To test the hypothesis that acute moderate hypoxia exposure has no detrimental effect on RW, while both metabolic and perceptual responses would be slightly higher. Methods: On separate days, 7 male university sprinters performed 3 × 30-s Wingate efforts with 4.5-min passive recovery in either hypoxia (FiO2: 0.145) or normoxia (FiO2: 0.209). Arterial oxygen saturation was assessed before the first Wingate effort, while blood lactate concentration and ratings of perceived exertion were measured after each bout. Results: Mean (P = .92) and peak (P = .63) power outputs, total work (P = .98), and the percentage decrement score (P = .25) were similar between conditions. Arterial oxygen saturation was significantly lower in hypoxia versus normoxia (92.0% [2.8%] vs 98.1% [0.4%], P < .01), whereas blood lactate concentration (P = .78) and ratings of perceived exertion (P = .51) did not differ between conditions. Conclusion: In sprinters, acute exposure to moderate hypoxia had no detrimental effect on RW performance and associated metabolic and perceptual responses.

Takei and Hatta are with the Dept of Sports Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. Takei is with the Murdoch Applied Sports Science Laboratory, Murdoch University, Perth, WA, Australia. Girard is with the School of Human Sciences (Exercise and Sport Science), The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia. Kakinoki is with the Blue Wych Limited Company, Kanagawa, Japan.

Takei (waseda.takei@gmail.com) is corresponding author.
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