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Context: Although skin-temperature assessment has received much attention in recent years as a possible internal-load measurement, scientific evidence is scarce. Purpose: To analyze baseline skin temperature and its rewarming through means of a cold-stress test before and after performing a marathon and to study the association between skin temperature and internal/external-load measurements. Methods: A total of 16 runners were measured 48 and 24 h before and 24 and 48 h after completing a marathon. The measurements on each day of testing included urine biomarkers of oxidative stress, pain and fatigue perception, skin temperature (at baseline and after a cold-stress test), and jump performance. Results: Reduced jump performance (P < .01 and effect size [ES] = 0.5) and higher fatigue and pain perception were observed 24 h after the marathon (P < .01 and ES > 0.8). Although no differences in baseline skin temperature were observed between the 4 measuring days, posterior legs presented lower constant (P < .01 and ES = 1.4) and higher slope (P = .04 and ES = 1.1) parameters in the algorithmic equations fitted for skin-temperature recovery after the cold-stress test 24 h after the marathon than on the day before the marathon. Regressions showed that skin-temperature parameters could be predicted by the ratio of ortho-tyrosine isomer to phenylalanine (oxidative stress biomarker) and body fat composition, among others. Conclusions: Although baseline skin temperature was not altered 24 or 48 h after a marathon, the application of cold stress after the marathon would appear to be a good method for providing information on vasoconstriction and a runner’s state of stress.

Priego-Quesada and Oficial-Casado are with the Research Group in Sport Biomechanics (GIBD), Dept of Physical Education and Sports, and Priego-Quesada, Pérez-Guarner, Gandia-Soriano, Galindo, Cibrián Ortiz de Anda, and Salvador Palmer, the Biophysics and Medical Physics Group (GIFIME), Dept of Physiology, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain. Piñeiro-Ramos, Sánchez-Illana, Kuligowski, and Vento are with the Neonatal Research Unit, Health Research Inst La Fe, Valencia, Spain. Vento is also with the Div of Neonatology, Hospital Universitario y Politécnico La Fe, Valencia, Spain. Barbosa is with the Physical Education Dept, Universidade Federal de Lavras, Lavras, Brazil.

Priego-Quesada (j.ignacio.priego@uv.es) is corresponding author.
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