Sensitivity of the iLOAD® Application for Monitoring Changes in Barbell Velocity Following Power- and Strength-Oriented Resistance Training Programs

in International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
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Objective: To evaluate the sensitivity of the iLOAD® application to detect the changes in mean barbell velocity of complete sets following power- and strength-oriented resistance training (RT) programs. Methods: Twenty men were randomly assigned to a power training group (countermovement jump and bench press throw at 40% of the 1-repetition maximum [1RM]) or strength training group (back squat and bench press at 70% to 90% of 1RM). Single sets of 10 repetitions at 25% and 70% of 1RM during the back squat and bench press exercises were assessed before and after the 4-week RT programs simultaneously with the iLOAD® application and a linear velocity transducer. Results: The power training group showed a greater increment in velocity performance at the 25% of 1RM (effect size range = 0.66–1.53) and the 70% of 1RM (effect size range = 0.11–0.30). The percent change in mean velocity after the RT programs highly correlated between the iLOAD® application and the linear velocity transducer for the back squat (r range = .85–.88) and bench press (r range = .87–.93). However, the iLOAD® application revealed a 2% greater increase in mean velocity after training compared to the linear velocity transducer. Conclusions: The iLOAD® application is a cost-effective, portable, and easy-to-use tool which can be used to detect changes in mean barbell velocity after power- and strength-oriented RT programs.

Pérez-Castilla and García-Ramos are with the Dept of Physical Education and Sport, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, Granada, Spain. Boullosa is with INISA, Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, Brazil; and the Sport and Exercise Science, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia. García-Ramos is also with the Dept of Sports Sciences and Physical Conditioning, Faculty of Education, Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción, Concepción, Chile.

García-Ramos (amagr@ugr.es) is corresponding author.
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