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Purpose: To analyze the anthropometric and physiological characteristics of competitive 15- to 16-year-old young male road cyclists and scale them according to a dichotomous category of successful/unsuccessful riders. Methods: A total of 103 15- to 16-year-old male road cyclists competing in the Italian national under 17 category performed a laboratory incremental exercise test during the in-season period. Age, height, body mass, body mass index, peak height velocity, and absolute and relative power output at 2 mmol/L and 4 mmol/L of blood lactate concentration were compared between 2 subgroups, including those scoring at least 1 point (successful, n = 70) and those that did not score points (unsuccessful, n = 61) in the general season ranking. Results: Successful and unsuccessful riders did not differ anthropometrically. Successful riders recorded significantly higher absolute and relative power output at 2 mmol/L and 4 mmol/L of blood lactate concentration compared with unsuccessful riders. Successful riders were also significantly older and had advanced biological maturation compared with their unsuccessful counterparts. Conclusion: Power associated with blood lactate profiles, together with chronological age and peak height velocity, plays an important role in determining race results in under 17 road cycling. Physiological tests could be helpful for coaches to measure these performance predictors.

Gallo, Filipas, Garbin, and Codella are with the School of Exercise and Sports Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy. Filipas, Codella, and Lovecchio are with the Dept of Biomedical Sciences for Health, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy. Filipas and Codella are also with the Dept of Endocrinology, Nutrition and Metabolic Diseases, IRCCS MultiMedica, Milan, Italy. Tornaghi is with the Va.Pe. Laboratorio di valutazione delle prestazioni, Verano Brianza, Monza and Brianza, Italy. Lovecchio is also with the Laboratory of Adapted Motor Activity (LAMA), University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy. Zaccaria is with the Centro interdipartimentale di Biologia e Medicina dello Sport, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy.

Codella (roberto.codella@unimi.it) is corresponding author.
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