The Association Between Alterations in Redox Homeostasis, Cortisol, and Commonly Used Objective and Subjective Markers of Fatigue in American Collegiate Football

in International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
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Purpose: To assess associations between a free oxygen radical test (FORT), free oxygen radical defense test (FORD), oxidative stress index, urinary cortisol, countermovement jump (CMJ), and subjective wellness in American college football. Methods: Twenty-three male student athlete American college football players were assessed over 10 weeks: off-season conditioning (3 wk), preseason camp (4 wk), and in season (3 wk). Assessments included a once-weekly FORT and FORD blood sample, urinary cortisol sample, CMJ assessment including flight time, reactive strength index modified and concentric impulse, and a daily subjective wellness questionnaire. Linear mixed models analyzed the effect of a 2 within-subject SD change in the predictor variable on the dependent variable. The effects were interpreted using magnitude-based inference and are presented as standardized effect size (ES) ± 90% confidence intervals. Results: Small negative associations were observed between FORT–flight time, FORT–fatigue, FORT–soreness (ES range = −0.30 to −0.48), FORD–sleep (ES = 0.42 ± 0.29), and oxidative stress index soreness (ES = 0.56 ± 0.29). Small positive associations were observed between FORT–cortisol (ES = 0.36 ± 0.35), FORD–flight time, FORD reactive strength index modified and FORD–soreness (0.37–0.41), oxidative stress index concentric impulse (ES = 0.37 ± 0.28), and with soreness–concentric impulse, soreness–flight time, and soreness reactive strength index modified (0.33–0.59). Moderate positive associations were observed between cortisol–concentric impulse and cortisol–sleep (0.57–0.60). Conclusion:FORT/FORD was associated with CMJ variables and subjective wellness. Greater amounts of subjective soreness were associated with decreased CMJ performance, increased FORT and cortisol, and decreased FORD.

McKay, Larkin, and Sampson are with the Centre for Medical and Exercise Physiology, School of Medicine, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia. McKay is also with the Dept of Athletics, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR, USA. Larkin is also with the Illawarra Health and Medical Research Inst, Keiraville, NSW, Australia. Delaney is with the Boston Celtics, Boston, MA, USA. Simpkin is with the School of Mathematics, Statistics and Applied Mathematics, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland. Murray is with the Inst of Sport, Physical Education and Health Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom. Pedlar and Lewis are with the Faculty of Sport, Health and Applied Science, St Mary’s University, London, United Kingdom. Pedlar is also with the Div of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London, United Kingdom. Lewis is also with the English Inst of Sport, United Kingdom.

Sampson (jsampson@uow.edu.au) is corresponding author.
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