What Influences Collegiate Coaches’ Intentions to Advance Their Leadership Careers? The Roles of Leader Self-Efficacy and Outcome Expectancies

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Moe Machida-Kosuga Osaka University of Health and Sport Sciences

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John M. Schaubroeck Michigan State University

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Daniel Gould Michigan State University

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Martha Ewing Michigan State University

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Deborah L. Feltz Michigan State University

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The purpose of the current study was to examine the influences of leader self-efficacy and coaching career outcome expectancies on intentions for advancement in leadership careers of collegiate assistant coaches in the United States. We also investigated psychosocial antecedents of these factors and explored gender differences. Female and male collegiate assistant coaches (N = 674) participated in an online survey consisting of measurements of leadership career advancement intentions, leader self-efficacy, and coaching career outcome expectancies, and their putative antecedents (i.e., developmental challenges, head coach professional support, family-work conflicts, and perceived gender discrimination). Results showed that leader self-efficacy and coaching career outcome expectancies were related to coaches’ leadership career advancement intentions. Developmental challenges and head coach professional support were positively related to leader self-efficacy, while family-work conflicts and perceived gender discrimination were negatively related to coaching career outcome expectancies. Findings also suggested that female assistant coaches may have higher coaching career outcome expectancies, but lower intentions toward leadership career advancement, leader self-efficacy, and developmental challenges than male assistant coaches. The study findings suggest ways to advance junior coaches’ leadership careers.

Moe Machida-Kosuga is an assistant professor at Osaka University of Health and Sport Sciences, where she teaches sport and exercise psychology at both undergraduate and graduate levels. She received her Ph.D. degree from Michigan State University. Her primary research interest is coach and athlete leadership and its development in sport. She also consults athletes, coaches, and sport teams on developing mental skills and group dynamics.

John M. Schaubroeck is currently the John A. Hannah Distinguished Professor of Management and Psychology at Michigan State University. He received his Ph.D. from the Krannert Graduate School of Management at Purdue University. His research interests relate primarily to leadership and employee well-being. He served as associate editor and then editor-in-chief at Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes (OBHDP) from 2004 through 2010.

Dan Gould is the director of the Institute for the Study of Youth Sports and professor in the Department of Kinesiology at the Michigan State University. His current research focuses on how coaches teach life skills to young athletes and developing youth leaders through the sport. He has also dedicated much of his career to applied sport psychology efforts, coaching education and writing applied sport psychology articles.

Martha Ewing was an associate professor of kinesiology at Michigan State University. She has written in the area of achievement motivation with a focus on youth in sport. In the applied arena, she had worked on developing a way to assess the effectiveness of the delivery of sport psychology services as well as the effectiveness of psychological skills training with athletes.

Deborah L. Feltz is University Distinguished Professor and Chairperson Emeritus in Kinesiology at Michigan State University. She earned her PhD in kinesiology from The Pennsylvania State University. Her research interests focus primarily on relationships among efficacy beliefs, motivation and performance in sport and physical activity. She is a Fellow in the American Psychological Association and National Academy of Kinesiology.

Address author correspondence to Moe Machida-Kosuga at machidam@ouhs.ac.jp.
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