360-Degree Feedback for Sport Coaches: A Follow-Up to O’Boyle (2014)

in International Sport Coaching Journal
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The sport literature yields little information concerning the available methods or processes coaches can use to obtain feedback about their coaching. This is unfortunate given that evaluative feedback about one’s coaching performance is useful in terms of providing direction for professional coach development (Mallett & Côté, 2006). As a follow-up to O’Boyle (2014), the purpose of this Best Practices paper is to offer a sample protocol for employing a 360-degree feedback system for coaches working in high performance settings. We draw on a review of the coach evaluation and 360-degree feedback literature, along with insights shared from Canadian intercollegiate head coaches to highlight some of the potential benefits and challenges of implementing a 360-degree feedback system in sport. We then suggest ‘best practices’ for effectively integrating this appraisal system and provide an example coach report to illustrate how feedback would be provided to a coach following a 360-degree feedback protocol. It is our hope that this sample protocol paper will encourage coaches, athletic directors, and other sport administrators to integrate comprehensive coach feedback practices in their sporting programs.

Matt Hoffmann is a PhD candidate in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Windsor. He is primarily interested in exploring the dynamics of peer mentoring relationships between athletes, including the benefits of such relationships for both mentees and mentors. He has received provincial and federal funding to support his research during graduate school.

Ashley Duguay is a PhD candidate in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Windsor. Through her research, she seeks to better understand group dynamics in sport and is particularly interested in using a social network approach to examine athlete leadership. She has received provincial and federal funding to support her research.

Michelle Guerrero is a PhD candidate in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Windsor. Her main research interests pertain to imagery use in physical activity settings and sport participation among individuals with disabilities. She is a certified health and wellness consultant and has received provincial and federal research funding.

Todd Loughead is a professor in the area of sport psychology in the Faculty of Human Kinetics at the University of Windsor. His current research interests include group dynamics in sport with a focus on developing athlete leadership skills, the importance of enhancing cohesion in sport, and the influence of peer-to-peer mentoring in sport and its impact on team functioning. He is a certified practitioner with the Canadian Sport Psychology Association and has extensive experience consulting with athletes.

Krista Munroe-Chandler is recognized for her work in the psychology of sport. She is a full professor in the Faculty of Human Kinetics at the University of Windsor, Canada. Her research interests include imagery use in sport and exercise as well as youth sport development. She works with athletes (both able bodied and athletes with a disability) of all ages, levels, and sport helping them achieve their personal performance goals.

Address author correspondence to Matt D. Hoffmann at hoffmanm@uwindsor.ca.
International Sport Coaching Journal