Similarities and Differences in Finger Interaction across Typical and Atypical Subpopulations

in Journal of Applied Biomechanics
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  • 1 The Pennsylvania State University
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The method of multidimensional scaling was applied to matrices of finger interaction (IFM) computed for individual participants for finger force production tasks. When IFMs for young controls, elderly, and persons with Down syndrome were pooled, only two dimensions described interpersonal differences; these were related to total force and to the total amount of enslaving. When IFMs for each group were analyzed separately, subpopulation-specific dimensions were found. Potentially, this analysis can be applied to discover meaningful dimensions that reflect differences in indices of finger interaction across and within subpopulations which differ in their apparent ability to use the hand. It may also be useful for tracking changes in finger interaction that occur in the process of specialized training or motor rehabilitation.

The authors are with the Dept. of Kinesiology, Rec. Hall, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802.

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