Foot Orthotic Devices Decrease Transverse Plane Motion during Landing from a Forward Vertical Jump in Healthy Females

in Journal of Applied Biomechanics
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The use of foot orthoses has been evaluated during a variety of functional activities. Twelve college-aged active females wore two types of foot orthoses and performed a vertical jump to determine the biomechanical effect of the orthoses on lower extremity transverse plane movement during landing. Data collection included three-dimensional analysis of the tibia, knee, and hip. A repeated-measures ANOVA was performed to determine the differences between no orthoses, over-the-counter, and custom-made orthoses with transverse plane motion. At the hip joint, there was significantly less internal rotation (p < .05) in the over-the-counter condition as compared with the no orthoses condition. There was significantly less tibial internal rotation (p < .05) in the custom-made condition as compared with no orthoses. Over-the-counter devices decreased transverse plane motion at the hip, whereas custom-made devices decreased transverse plane motion of the tibia.

Jenkins, Williams, Durland, and Adams are with the Department of Physical Therapy, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC. O’Brien is with Allied Health Biostatistics, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC.