Influence of Custom Foot Orthotic Intervention on Lower Extremity Intralimb Coupling during a 30-Minute Run

in Journal of Applied Biomechanics
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The purpose of this study was to analyze the influence of a custom foot orthotic (CFO) intervention on lower extremity intralimb coupling during a 30-min run in a group of injured runners and to compare the results to a control group of healthy runners. Three-dimensional kinematic data were collected during a 30-min run on healthy female runners (Shoe-only) and a group of female runners who had a recent history of overuse injury (Shoe-only and Shoe with custom foot orthoses). Results from the study revealed that the coordination variability and pattern for the some couplings were influenced by history of injury, foot orthotic intervention and the duration of the run. These data suggest that custom foot orthoses worn by injured runners may play a role in the maintenance of coordination variability of the tibia (transverse plane) and calcaneus (frontal plane) coupling during the Early Stance phase. In addition, it appears that the coupling angle between the knee (transverse plane) and rearfoot (frontal plane) joints becomes more symmetrical in the late stance phase as a run progresses.

Christopher L. MacLean (Corresponding Author) was with the Biomechanics Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, University of Massachusetts–Amherst, Amherst, MA; Maclean is now with Paris Orthotics Laboratory Division, Vancouver, BC, Canada. Richard van Emmerik and Joseph Hamill are with the Biomechanics Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, University of Massachusetts–Amherst, Amherst, MA.