Mechanomyographic Responses for the Biceps Brachii Are Unable to Track the Declines in Peak Torque During 25, 50, 75, and 100 Fatiguing Isokinetic Muscle Actions

in Journal of Applied Biomechanics
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  • 1 Texas Tech University
  • | 2 University of Oklahoma
  • | 3 Oklahoma State University
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This study examined the peak torque and mechanomyographic (MMG) amplitude and mean frequency (MNF) responses during fatiguing isokinetic muscle actions. On four separate occasions, twenty men (mean ± SD age = 23 ± 3 years) performed 25, 50, 75, and 100 repeated maximal concentric isokinetic muscle actions of the dominant forearm flexors. During each muscle action, the MMG signal was detected from the biceps brachii with an accelerometer. The data were examined with linear regression and one-way repeated measures analyses of variance. The results indicated that the mean percent decline in peak torque value for the 25 repetition trial (25.6%) was significantly less than that for the 50 repetition trial (45.2%). Furthermore, the mean linear slope coefficient for the peak torque versus repetition number relationship for the 50 repetition trial was significantly less than that for the 100 repetition trial. There were no mean differences among the trials for the linear slope coefficients and y-intercepts for the MMG amplitude and MNF versus repetition number relationships. When detected with an accelerometer, the linear slope coefficients and y-intercepts for the MMG amplitude and MNF versus repetition number relationships were not sensitive enough to track the decline in muscle function during fatigue.

Matt S. Stock (Corresponding Author) is with the Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Health, Exercise, and Sport Sciences, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX. Travis W. Beck and Xin Ye are with the Biophysics Laboratory, Department of Health and Exercise Science, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK. Jason M. DeFreitas is with the Applied Musculoskeletal and Human Physiology Laboratory, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK.

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