A Kinetic and Kinematic Analysis of the Effect of Stochastic Resonance Electrical Stimulation and Knee Sleeve During Gait in Osteoarthritis of the Knee

in Journal of Applied Biomechanics
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  • 1 University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
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Extended use of knee sleeves in populations at risk for knee osteoarthritis progression has shown functional and quality of life benefits; however, additional comprehensive kinematic and kinetic analyses are needed to determine possible physical mechanisms of these benefits which may be due to the sleeve’s ability to enhance knee proprioception. A novel means of extending these enhancements may be through stochastic resonance stimulation. Our goal was to determine whether the use of a knee sleeve alone or combined with stochastic resonance electrical stimulation improves knee mechanics in knee osteoarthritis. Gait kinetics and kinematics were assessed in subjects with medial knee osteoarthritis when presented with four conditions: control1, no electrical stimulation/sleeve, 75% threshold stimulation/sleeve, and control2. An increase in knee flexion angle throughout stance and a decrease in flexion moment occurring immediately after initial contact were seen in the stimulation/sleeve and sleeve alone conditions; however, these treatment conditions did not affect the knee adduction angle and internal knee abduction moment during weight acceptance. No differences were found between the sleeve alone and the stochastic resonance with sleeve conditions. A knee sleeve can improve sagittal-plane knee kinematics and kinetics, although adding the current configuration of stochastic resonance did not enhance these effects.

Amber Collins (Corresponding Author) is with the Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC. Troy Blackburn is with the Department of Orthopaedics, the Department of Exercise and Sport Science, and the Division of Physical Therapy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC. Chris Olcott is with the Department of Orthopaedics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC. Joanne M. Jordan is with the Department of Orthopaedics and with the Thurston Arthritis Research Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC. Bing Yu is with the Department of Biomedical Engineering and with the Division of Physical Therapy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC. Paul Weinhold is with the Department of Orthopaedics and with the Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC.