Kinetics of Badminton Lunges in Four Directions

in Journal of Applied Biomechanics

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Youlian HongChengdu Sports University
Chinese University of Hong Kong

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Shao Jun WangChinese University of Hong Kong

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Wing Kai LamLi Ning Sports Science Research Center, Beijing

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Jason Tak-Man CheungLi Ning Sports Science Research Center, Beijing

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The lunge is the most fundamental skill in badminton competitions. Fifteen university-level male badminton players performed lunge maneuvers in four directions, namely, right-forward, left-forward, right-backward, and left-backward, while wearing two different brands of badminton shoes. The test compared the kinetics of badminton shoes in performing typical lunge maneuvers. A force plate and an insole measurement system measured the ground reaction forces and plantar pressures. These measurements were compared across all lunge maneuvers. The left-forward lunge generated significantly higher first vertical impact force (2.34 ± 0.52 BW) than that of the right-backward (2.06 ± 0.60 BW) and left-backward lunges (1.78 ± 0.44 BW); higher second vertical impact force (2.44 ± 0.51 BW) than that of the left-backward lunge (2.07 ± 0.38 BW); and higher maximum anterior-posterior shear force (1.48 ± 0.36 BW) than that of the left-backward lunge (1.18 ± 0.38 BW). Compared with other lunge directions, the left-forward lunge showed higher mean maximum vertical impact anterior-posterior shear forces and their respective maximum loading rates, and the plantar pressure at the total foot and heel regions. Therefore, the left-forward lunge is a critical maneuver for badminton biomechanics and related footwear research because of the high loading magnitude generated during heel impact.

Youlian Hong (Corresponding Author) is with the Department of Sports Medicine, Chengdu Sports University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China, and with the Department of Sports Science and Physical Education, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. Shao Jun Wang is with the Department of Sports Science and Physical Education, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. Wing Kai Lam and Jason Tak-Man Cheung are with the Li Ning Sports Science Research Center, Beijing, China.

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