Evaluating the Acromion Marker Cluster as a Method for Measuring Scapular Orientation in Children With Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy

in Journal of Applied Biomechanics

Click name to view affiliation

Kristen F. NicholsonUniversity of Delaware

Search for other papers by Kristen F. Nicholson in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Stephanie A. RussoUniversity of Delaware

Search for other papers by Stephanie A. Russo in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Scott H. KozinTemple University
Shriners Hospital for Children, Philadelphia

Search for other papers by Scott H. Kozin in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Dan A. ZlotolowTemple University
Shriners Hospital for Children, Philadelphia

Search for other papers by Dan A. Zlotolow in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Robert L. HulbertUniversity of Delaware

Search for other papers by Robert L. Hulbert in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
K. Michael RowleyUniversity of Delaware

Search for other papers by K. Michael Rowley in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
James G. RichardsUniversity of Delaware

Search for other papers by James G. Richards in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Restricted access

Several studies have described using an acromion marker cluster for measuring scapular orientation in healthy adults performing planar motions. It is unknown whether the acromion marker cluster method will provide the same level of accuracy in children with brachial plexus birth palsy. This study compared this method to palpation for calculating scapular orientation in children with brachial plexus birth palsy performing clinically relevant movements. Scapular orientation in ten patients was determined by palpation and an acromion marker cluster in neutral and six Modified Mallet positions. RMSEs and mean relative errors were calculated. Resultant RMSEs ranged from 5.2 degrees to 21.4 degrees. The averages of the mean relative errors across all positions for each axis were 177.4% for upward/downward rotation, 865.0% for internal/external rotation, and 166.2% for anterior/posterior tilt. The acromion marker cluster method did not accurately measure scapular rotation relative to the total movement on an individual or group basis in the population. With most relative errors over 100%, the acromion marker cluster method often produced errors larger than the actual measured motion. The accuracy of the acromion marker cluster method limits its use as a clinical tool for measuring scapular kinematics on children with brachial plexus birth palsy.

Kristen F. Nicholson (Corresponding Author) is with the Biomechanics and Movement Science Program, University of Delaware, Newark, DE. Stephanie A. Russo is with the Biomechanics and Movement Science Program, University of Delaware, Newark, DE. Scott H. Kozin is with the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, and with the Upper Extremity Center of Excellence, Shriners Hospital for Children, Philadelphia, PA. Dan A. Zlotolow is with the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, and with the Upper Extremity Center of Excellence, Shriners Hospital for Children, Philadelphia, PA. Robert L. Hulbert is with the Department of Kinesiology and Applied Physiology, University of Delaware, Newark, DE. K. Michael Rowley is with the Department of Kinesiology and Applied Physiology, University of Delaware, Newark, DE. James G. Richards is with the Biomechanics and Movement Science Program and with the Department of Kinesiology and Applied Physiology, University of Delaware, Newark, DE.

  • Collapse
  • Expand