One-Leg Standing Performance and Muscle Activity: Are There Limb Differences?

in Journal of Applied Biomechanics
Restricted access

Purchase article

USD  $24.95

Student 1 year subscription

USD  $87.00

1 year subscription

USD  $116.00

Student 2 year subscription

USD  $165.00

2 year subscription

USD  $215.00

The purpose of this study was to compare static balance performance and muscle activity during one-leg standing on the dominant and nondominant leg under various sensory conditions with increased levels of task difficulty. Thirty healthy young adults (age: 23 ± 2 years) performed one-leg standing tests for 30 s under three sensory conditions (ie, eyes open/firm ground; eyes open/foam ground [elastic pad on top of the balance plate]; eyes closed/firm ground). Center of pressure displacements and activity of four lower leg muscles (ie, m. tibialis anterior [TA], m. soleus [SOL], m. gastrocnemius medialis [GAS], m. peroneus longus [PER]) were analyzed. An increase in sensory task difficulty resulted in deteriorated balance performance (P < .001, effect size [ES] = .57−2.54) and increased muscle activity (P < .001, ES = .50−1.11) for all but two muscles (ie, GAS, PER). However, regardless of the sensory condition, one-leg standing on the dominant as compared with the nondominant limb did not produce statistically significant differences in various balance (P > .05, ES = .06−.22) and electromyographic (P > .05, ES = .03−.13) measures. This indicates that the dominant and the nondominant leg can be used interchangeably during static one-leg balance testing in healthy young adults.

Thomas Muehlbauer is with the Department of Training and Movement Sciences, Cluster of Excellency in Cognition Sciences, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany. Claude Mettler and Ralf Roth are each with the Institute of Exercise and Health Sciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland, Urs Granacher is with the Department of Training and Movement Sciences, Cluster of Excellency in Cognition Sciences, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany. Address author correspondence to Thomas Muehlbauer at thomas.muehlbauer@uni-potsdam.de.