We are updating our website on Thursday, December 2 from 9 AM – 5 PM EST. During this time, users may experience some disruptions while using the site. We apologize for the inconvenience.

Comparison of Three-Dimensional Patellofemoral Joint Reaction Forces in Persons With and Without Patellofemoral Pain

in Journal of Applied Biomechanics
View More View Less
  • 1 University of Southern California
  • | 2 National Taiwan University
Restricted access

Purchase article

USD  $24.95

Student 1 year online subscription

USD  $90.00

1 year online subscription

USD  $120.00

Student 2 year online subscription

USD  $172.00

2 year online subscription

USD  $229.00

The purpose of this study was to determine if persons with patellofemoral pain (PFP) exhibit differences in patellofemoral joint reaction forces (PFJRFs) during functional activities. Forty females (20 PFP, 20 controls) underwent two phases of data collection: (1) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and (2) biomechanical analysis during walking, running, stair ascent, and stair descent. A previously described three-dimensional model was used to estimate PFJRFs. Resultant PFJRFs and the orthogonal components were reported. The PFP group demonstrated lower peak resultant PFJRFs and posterior component and superior component of the PFJRFs compared with the control group across all conditions. However, the PFP group had a higher peak lateral component of the PFJRF in three out of the four conditions evaluated. The lower resultant PFJRFs suggested that individuals with PFP may employ strategies to minimize patellofemoral joint loading, but it did not result in diminished lateral forces acting on the patella.

Yu-Jen Chen and Christopher M. Powers are with the Jacquelin Perry Musculoskeletal Biomechanics Research Laboratory, Division of Biokinesiology and Physical Therapy at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA. Yu-Jen Chen is also with the School and Graduate Institute of Physical Therapy, College of Medicine, at National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (R.O.C.).

Address author correspondence to Christopher M. Powers at powers@usc.edu.
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 1260 946 61
Full Text Views 36 19 4
PDF Downloads 38 13 3