The Effect of Exertion on Joint Kinematics and Kinetics During Running Using a Waveform Analysis Approach

in Journal of Applied Biomechanics
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About half of all runners sustain a running-related injury every year. Exertion may contribute to risk of injury by altering joint mechanics. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of exertion on runners’ joint mechanics using principal component analysis (PCA). Three-dimensional motion analysis of the lower extremity was performed on 16 healthy female runners before and after their typical training run. PCA was used to determine exertion-related changes in joint mechanics at the ankle, knee, and hip. Statistical significance for repeated-measures MANOVA of the retained principal components at each joint and plane of motion was at P < .05. Exercise effects were identified at the ankle (greater rate of eversion [PC2: P = .027], and decreased plantar flexion moment [overall: P = .044] and external rotation moment [PC3: P = .003]), knee (increased adduction [overall: P = .044] and internal rotation [PC3: P = .034], and decreased abduction moment [overall: P = .045]), and hip (increased internal rotation [PC1: P = .013] and range of mid- to late-stance rotation [PC2: P = .009], and decreased internal rotation moment [PC1: P = .001]). The observed changes in running mechanics reflect a gait profile that is often linked to running injury. The effects of more strenuous activity may result in mechanics that present an even greater risk for injury.

Lauren C. Benson and Kristian M. O’Connor are with the Department of Kinesiology, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI.

Address author correspondence to Lauren C. Benson at lbenson@uwm.edu.
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