Toe-Out Gait Decreases the Second Peak of the Medial Knee Contact Force

in Journal of Applied Biomechanics
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Toe-out angle alternation is a potential tactic for decreasing the knee adduction moment during walking. Published reports have not examined the medial knee contact force during the toe-out gait, although it is a factor affecting knee articular cartilage damage. This study investigated the effects of increased toe-out angle on the medial knee contact force, using musculoskeletal simulation analysis. For normal and toe-out gaits in 18 healthy subjects, the muscle tension forces were simulated based on the joint moments and ground reaction forces with optimization process. The medial knee contact force during stance phase was determined using the sum of the muscle force and joint reaction force components. The first and second peaks of the medial knee contact force were compared between the gaits. The toe-out gait showed a significant decrease in the medial knee contact force at the second peak, compared with the normal gait. In contrast, the medial knee contact forces at the first peak were not significantly different between the gaits. These results suggest that the toe-out gait is beneficial for decreasing the second peak of the medial knee contact force.

Shinya Ogaya, Akira Iwata, Yumi Higuchi, and Satoshi Fuchioka are with the Division of Physical Therapy, Department of Comprehensive Rehabilitation, Osaka Prefecture University, Osaka, Japan. Hisashi Naito is with the School of Mechanical Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa City, Ishikawa, Japan. Masao Tanaka is with the Division of Bioengineering, Department of Mechanical Science and Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan.

Address author correspondence to Shinya Ogaya at ogaya@rehab.osakafu-u.ac.jp.