Reliability of the Load–Velocity Relationship Obtained Through Linear and Polynomial Regression Models to Predict the 1-Repetition Maximum Load

in Journal of Applied Biomechanics
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  • 1 University of Granada
  • 2 Edith Cowan University
  • 3 Catholic University of the Most Holy Concepción
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This study aimed to compare the between-session reliability of the load–velocity relationship between (1) linear versus polynomial regression models, (2) concentric-only versus eccentric–concentric bench press variants, as well as (3) the within-participants versus the between-participants variability of the velocity attained at each percentage of the 1-repetition maximum. The load–velocity relationship of 30 men (age: 21.2 [3.8] y; height: 1.78 [0.07] m, body mass: 72.3 [7.3] kg; bench press 1-repetition maximum: 78.8 [13.2] kg) were evaluated by means of linear and polynomial regression models in the concentric-only and eccentric–concentric bench press variants in a Smith machine. Two sessions were performed with each bench press variant. The main findings were: (1) first-order polynomials (coefficient of variation: 4.39%–4.70%) provided the load–velocity relationship with higher reliability than the second-order polynomials (coefficient of variation: 4.68%–5.04%); (2) the reliability of the load–velocity relationship did not differ between the concentric-only and eccentric–concentric bench press variants; and (3) the within-participants variability of the velocity attained at each percentage of the 1-repetition maximum was markedly lower than the between-participants variability. Taken together, these results highlight that, regardless of the bench press variant considered, the individual determination of the load–velocity relationship by a linear regression model could be recommended to monitor and prescribe the relative load in the Smith machine bench press exercise.

Pestaña-Melero, Rojas, Pérez-Castilla, and García-Ramos are with the Department of Physical Education and Sport, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, Granada, Spain. Haff is with Center for Exercise and Sport Science Research, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia. García-Ramos is also with the Faculty of Education, Catholic University of the Most Holy Concepción, CIEDE, Concepción, Chile.

García-Ramos (amagr@ugr.es) is corresponding author.
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