Running and Walking Foot Loading in Children Aged 4–10 Years

in Journal of Applied Biomechanics
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Although previous reports have provided normative plantar pressure data for walking in children, evaluation during running is lacking. This study aimed to compare foot loading patterns during running and walking in children aged 4–10 years. Furthermore, the relationship between running baropodometric parameters and anthropometric measures was investigated. Foot loading of 120 volunteers was evaluated during running and walking using an Emed AT-4 pressure platform. Analyses were performed for 5 anatomical regions (rearfoot, midfoot, forefoot, hallux, and lesser toes). Higher peak pressure and maximum force values were seen under most foot regions during running in comparison with walking, whereas relative contact area tended to increase only in the midfoot. Data for running indicated that aging explained less than 23% of the variance of plantar loads and contact area. Running foot loads were more associated with height, body mass, and foot length. This study’s data described plantar loads under the feet of children were greater during running. Aging was associated with little increase in running plantar loads and larger contact areas. Results may be useful as reference to characterize foot loading during running and in the development of orthoses in clinical applications or products such as sport shoes for children.

Mesquita, Neri, Lima, and David are with the College of Physical Education, University of Brasília, Brasília, DF, Brazil. Manfio is with Feevale University, Novo Hamburgo, RS, Brazil.

Mesquita (paulamesquitaa@hotmail.com) is corresponding author.
Journal of Applied Biomechanics
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