Senior Drivers: An Overview of Problems and Intervention Strategies

in Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
View More View Less
Restricted access

Purchase article

USD  $24.95

Student 1 year online subscription

USD  $77.00

1 year online subscription

USD  $103.00

Student 2 year online subscription

USD  $147.00

2 year online subscription

USD  $196.00

Individuals age 65 and over represent the most rapidly growing segment of the driving population in North America. Although the driving privilege helps seniors maintain greater levels of independence and self-sufficiency, many deficits in driving-related abilities increase with age and can place some individuals, or other road users, at risk for property destruction or personal injury. Drastic age-related declines in driving-related abilities are not inevitable, however. Aging-driver-specific programs have been shown to be effective in ensuring that older drivers remain safe and competent on the roads. Current research suggests that Visual-Motor Useful Field of View training might be an effective means of assessing and enhancing many of the functional psychomotor tasks required by senior drivers. The potential success of such specific fitness and psychomotor training programs has great implications for helping seniors maintain independent living and an improved quality of life for as long as possible.

Klavora is with the Faculty of Physical Education and Health, and Heslegrave, with University Health Network and the Dept. of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 1A1 Canada.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 204 154 10
Full Text Views 8 5 1
PDF Downloads 10 7 1