Effects of Resistance- and Flexibility-Exercise Interventions on Balance and Related Measures in Older Adults

in Journal of Aging and Physical Activity

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Marie-Louise Bird
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Keith Hill
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Madeleine Ball
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Andrew D. Williams
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This research explored the balance benefits to untrained older adults of participating in community-based resistance and flexibility programs. In a blinded randomized crossover trial, 32 older adults (M = 66.9 yr) participated in a resistance-exercise program and a flexibility-exercise program for 16 weeks each. Sway velocity and mediolateral sway range were recorded. Timed up-and-go, 10 times sit-to-stand, and step test were also assessed, and lower limb strength was measured. Significant improvements in sway velocity, as well as timed up-and-go, 10 times sit-to-stand, and step test, were seen with both interventions, with no significant differences between the 2 groups. Resistance training resulted in significant increases in strength that were not evident in the flexibility intervention. Balance performance was significantly improved after both resistance training and standing flexibility training; however, further investigation is required to determine the mechanisms responsible for the improvement.

Bird, Ball, and Williams are with the School of Human Life Sciences, University of Tasmania, Launceston, Tasmania, 7250 Australia. Hill is with the Faculty of Health Sciences, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria, 3083 Australia.

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