Interruption of Physical Activity Because of Illness in the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders Pilot Trial

in Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
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Objectives:

To examine baseline characteristics and change in gait speed and Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) scores in participants medically suspended (MS) from a physical activity intervention (PA).

Design:

Randomized controlled trial.

Setting:

University and community centers.

Participants:

Sedentary older adults (N = 213) randomized to PA in the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders Pilot (LIFE-P).

Measurements:

MS was defined as missing 3 consecutive PA sessions in adoption and transition phases or 2 wk in maintenance phase because of a health event.

Results:

In all, 122 participants completed PA without MS (NMS subgroup), 48 participants underwent MS and resumed PA (SR subgroup), and 43 participants underwent MS and did not complete PA (SNR subgroup). At baseline, SNR walked slower (p = .03), took more prescribed medications (p = .02), and had lower SPPB scores than NMS and SR (p = .02). Changes from baseline to Month 12 SPPB scores were affected by suspension status, adjusted mean (SE) SPPB change: SNR 0.0957 (0.3184), SR 0.9413 (0.3063), NMS 1.0720 (0.1871); p = .03.

Conclusions:

MS participants unable to return to complete the PA in a trial of mobility-limited sedentary older adults had slower walking speeds, lower SPPB scores, and a higher number of prescribed medications at baseline. Change in SPPB scores at 12 months was related to suspension status.

Phillips and Fielding are with the Nutrition, Exercise Physiology, and Sarcopenia Laboratory, Tufts University, Boston, MA. Katula and Rejeski are with the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC. Miller and Walkup are with the Dept. of Biostatistical Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC. Brach is with the School of Health and Rehabilitative Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA. King is with the Dept. of Health Research & Policy, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA. Church is with the Preventive Medicine Research Laboratory, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA.