Physical Activity Levels of Older Adults Receiving a Home Care Service

in Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
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The 3 study objectives were to compare the activity levels of older people who had received a restorative home care service with those of people who had received “usual” home care, explore the predictors of physical activity in these 2 groups, and determine whether either group met the minimum recommended activity levels for their age group. A questionnaire was posted to 1,490 clients who had been referred for a home care service between 2006 and 2009. Older people who had received a restorative care service were more active than those who had received usual care (p = .049), but service group did not predict activity levels when other variables were adjusted for in a multiple regression. Younger individuals who were in better physical condition, with good mobility and no diagnosis of depression, were more likely to be active. Investigation of alternatives to the current exercise component of the restorative program is needed.

Burton and Lewin are with the Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, and Boldy, the School of Nursing and Midwifery, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.