Change in Quality of Life Among Breast Cancer Survivors After Resistance Training: Is There an Effect of Age?

in Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
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To evaluate the effect of age on quality of life (QOL) in breast cancer survivors after resistance training, 20 women were assigned to 1 of 2 groups based on age (YRT 40–59 yr, ORT 60–80 yr). Both groups completed 3 sets of 8 exercises twice a week for 8 wk. Measurements were obtained before and after the training program. QOL was measured using the Body Image and Relationship Scale (BIRS). Both groups improved in chest press (p < .001), leg press (p < .001), arm curls (p < .05), and chair stands (p < .001). For QOL, YRT reported greater improvements compared with ORT in BIRS total score (Group × Time interaction, p = .002) and strength and health subscale score (Group × Time interaction, p = .001), and greater age was related to greater perceived impairment (BIRS total: r = .61, p = .004; strength and health subscale: r = .69, p = .001). Despite significant improvements in strength and function, older women perceived relatively little improvement in QOL compared with younger women, and age had a differential negative influence on improvements in QOL.

Benton is with the Beth-El College of Nursing and Health Sciences, University of Colorado Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs, CO. Schlairet is with the College of Nursing and Health Sciences, and Gibson, the Dept. of Mathematics and Computer Science, Valdosta State University, Valdosta, GA.