Self-efficacy, Neighborhood Walking, and Fall History in Older Adults

in Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
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This cross-sectional study examined the association of self-efficacy with neighborhood walking in older adult (mean age = 76.1, SD = 8.34) fallers (n = 108) and nonfallers (n = 217) while controlling for demographic characteristics and mobility. Hierarchical multiple regression indicated that the full model explained 39% of the variance in neighborhood walking in fallers (P < .001) and 24% in nonfallers (P < .001). Self-efficacy explained 23% of the variance in fallers (P < .001) and 11% in nonfallers (P < .001). Neighborhood walking was significantly associated with self-efficacy for individual barriers in both groups. Self-efficacy for neighborhood barriers trended toward significance in fallers (β = .18, P = .06). Fall history did not moderate the relationship between self-efficacy and neighborhood walking. Walking interventions for older adults should address self-efficacy in overcoming individual walking barriers. Those targeting fallers should consider addressing self-efficacy for overcoming neighborhood barriers.

Gallagher and Loveland-Cherry are with University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, MI. Clarke is with University of Michigan Institute for Social Research, Ann Arbor, MI. Ronis is with University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, MI, and VA Center for Clinical Management Research. Gretebeck is with University of Wisconsin School of Nursing, Madison, WI. Address author correspondence to N.A. Gallagher at nagalla@med.umich.edu.