Spin Exercise Improves Semantic Fluency in Previously Sedentary Older Adults

in Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
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Studies suggest improvements of neurocognitive function among older adults who undergo aerobic exercise training. This study sought to examine the impact of an aerobic exercise intervention on verbal fluency in sedentary older adults. Twenty community-dwelling older adults were recruited and enrolled in either a spin exercise group or a control condition. Participants were evaluated with an estimated V02max test and on measures of letter, category, and switching verbal fluency both before and after a 12-week intervention period. Spin exercise resulted in a significant improvement in category (semantic) verbal fluency when compared with the control group (15% vs. 2% increase, respectively; P = .001). Spin exercise also resulted in a significant improvement in estimated V02max (P = .005). Also important, the spin exercise group demonstrated a high level of adherence (mean adherence = 82.5%). Spin exercise can be an effective mode of aerobic exercise to improve semantic fluency in previously sedentary older adults.

Nocera, McGregor, and Crosson are with the VA Rehabilitation R&D Center of Excellence, Atlanta VAMC, Atlanta, GA, and the Department of Neurology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA. Hass is with the Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. Address author correspondence to Joe Nocera at joenocera@emory.edu.