Age-Related Loss of Muscle Mass, Strength, and Power and Their Association With Mobility in Recreationally-Active Older Adults in the United Kingdom

in Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
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To investigate reasons for the age-related reduction in physical function, we determined the relationships between muscle size, strength, and power with 6-min walk distance (6MWD) and timed up-and-go performance in 49 young (23 ± 3.1 years) and 66 healthy, mobile older adults (72 ± 5 years). While muscle mass, determined by DXA and MRI, did not correlate with performance in the older adults, power per body mass, determined from a countermovement jump, did correlate. The 40% lower jumping power observed in older adults (p < .05) was due to a lower take-off velocity, which explained 34% and 42% of the variance in 6MWD in older women and men, respectively (p < .01). The lower velocity was partly attributable to the higher body mass to maximal force ratio, but most was due to a lower intrinsic muscle speed. While changes in muscle function explain part of the age-related reduction in functional performance, ~60% of the deficit remains to be explained.

Maden-Wilkinson is with the School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom. McPhee, Jones, and Degens are with the School of Healthcare Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, United Kingdom.

Address author correspondence to Jamie S. McPhee at j.s.mcphee@mmu.ac.uk.