Association Between Body Mass Index, Physical Activity, and Health-Related Quality of Life in Canadian Adults

in Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
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Background:

Obesity is associated with impairments in health-related quality of life (HRQL), whereas physical activity (PA) is a promoter of HRQL.

Purpose:

The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction between BMI and PA with HRQL in younger and older Canadian adults.

Methods:

Data from the 2012 annual component of the Canadian Community Health Survey (N = 48,041; = 30 years) were used to capture self-reported body mass index (BMI-kg/m2), PA (kcal/kg/day, KKD), and HRQL. Interactions between PA and age on the BMI and HRQL relationship were assessed using general linear models and logistic regression.

Results:

Those younger (younger: μ = 0.79 ± 0.02; older: μ = 0.70 ± 0.02) and more active (active: μ = 0.82 ± 0.02; moderately active: μ = 0.77 ± 0.03; inactive: μ = 0.73 ± 0.01) reported higher HRQL. Older inactive underweight, normal weight, and overweight adults have lower odds of high HRQL.

Conclusion:

PA was associated with higher HRQL in younger adults. In older adults, BMI and PA influenced HRQL.

Cohen, Baker, and Ardern are with the School of Kinesiology and Health Science, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Address author correspondence to Chris I. Ardern at cardern@yorku.ca.