Barriers to Physical Activity Following Rehabilitation: Perspectives of Older Adults with Chronic Disease

in Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
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Nonadherence to exercise is a main cause of reduced function for older adults with chronic disease following completion of rehabilitation. This quantitative study used a questionnaire to evaluate the barriers and facilitators to community-based exercise following rehabilitation, from the perspectives of older adults with chronic diseases and their healthcare professionals (HCPs). Questionnaires were administered one-on-one to 83 older adults and 35 HCPs. Those with chronic disease perceived cost (43%), travel time (43%), and physical symptoms (39%) as primary barriers to program participation, with similar perceptions across all chronic conditions. Access to a case manager (82%), a supported transition following rehabilitation (78%), and a condition-specific program (78%) were the primary facilitators. Significant between group differences were found between HCPs and older adults with chronic disease across all barriers (p < .001), with a greater number of HCPs perceiving barriers to exercise participation. There were no between-group differences in the perception of factors that facilitate participation in exercise.

Desveaux is with the Rehabilitation Sciences Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; and the Department of Respiratory Medicine, West Park Healthcare Centre, Toronto, Canada. Goldstein is with the Department of Respiratory Medicine, West Park Healthcare Centre, Toronto, Canada; and the Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto Canada. Mathur is with the Rehabilitation Sciences Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; the Department of Respiratory Medicine, West Park Healthcare Centre, Toronto, Canada; and the Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. Brooks is with the Rehabilitation Sciences Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; the Department of Respiratory Medicine, West Park Healthcare Centre, Toronto, Canada; and the Department of Physical Therapy and Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

Address author correspondence to Dina Brooks at dina.brooks@utoronto.ca.
Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
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