Task-Oriented Exercise to Reduce Activities of Daily Living Disability in Vulnerable Older Adults: A Feasibility Study of the 3-Step Workout for Life

in Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
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The purpose of this feasibility study was to evaluate the 3-Step Workout for Life program, a 10-week exercise program that included moderate-intensity muscle strength training followed by task-oriented training. Fourteen participants completed the program (mean age = 73 years; SD = 6.83). The Box and Block test (Z = −2.24, p = .03) and the 30-s chair stand test (Z = −2.21, p = .03) indicate improved physical functioning of the upper and lower extremities. More importantly, results of the function component from the Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument (Z = −2.04, p = .04) and motor skills scale from the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (Z = −2.97, p = .003) indicate subjective and objective improvements on performing activities of daily living. Supplementing moderate-intensity muscle strength exercise with taskoriented training components is feasible. Preliminary data support the effectiveness of 3-Step Workout for Life in reducing late-life disability.

Liu, Jones, and Formyduval are with the Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN. Clark is with the Indiana University Center for Aging Research, Regenstrief Institute, Inc., Indiana University School ofMedicine, Indianapolis, IN.

Address author correspondence to Chiung-ju Liu at liu41@iu.edu.