A Cross-Sectional Comparison of Quality of Life Between Physically Active and Underactive Older Men With Prostate Cancer

in Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
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Men with prostate cancer experience many side effects and symptoms that may be improved by a physically active lifestyle. It was hypothesized that older men with prostate cancer who were physically active would report significantly higher levels of quality of life (QOL) as assessed by the WHOQOL-BREF and the WHOQOL-OLD. Of the 348 prostate cancer survivors who were invited to participate in the present postal survey, 137 men returned the questionnaires. Those who were physically active had significantly lower prostate specific antigen (PSA) scores and higher social participation than those insufficiently active. These findings offer some support for the benefits of physical activity (PA) within the prostate cancer population in managing the adverse side effects of their treatments on aspects of their QOL. Future research should more closely examine what types of PA best promote improvements in varying aspects of QOL and psychological well-being for prostate cancer survivors.

Boisen and Gray are with the Cluster for Health Improvement, Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, Australia. Krägeloh, Shepherd, and Ryan are with the Department of Psychology, AUT University, Auckland, New Zealand. Masters is with the Auckland City Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand. Osborne is with North Shore Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand. MacLeod is with HammondCare, Greenwich Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; and Northern Clinical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. Keogh is with the Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine, Bond University, Gold Coast, Australia; the Cluster for Health Improvement, Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, Australia; and the Human Potential Centre, AUT University, Auckland, New Zealand.

Address author correspondence to Justin Keogh at jkeogh@bond.edu.au.