An Examination of Exercise-Induced Feeling States and Their Association With Future Participation in Physical Activity Among Older Adults

in Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
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Although exercise-induced feeling states may play a role in driving future behavior, their role in relation to older adults’ participation in physical activity (PA) has seldom been considered. The objectives of this study were to describe changes in older adults’ feeling states during exercise, and examine if levels of and changes in feeling states predicted their future participation in PA. Self-reported data on feeling states were collected from 82 older adults immediately before, during, and after a moderate-intensity exercise session, and on participation in PA 1 month later. Data were analyzed using latent growth modeling. Feelings of revitalization, positive engagement, and tranquility decreased during exercise, whereas feelings of physical exhaustion increased. Feelings of revitalization immediately before the exercise session predicted future participation in PA; changes in feeling states did not. This study does not provide empirical evidence that older adults’ exercise-induced feeling states predict their future participation in PA.

Brunet is with the School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Institut du savoir de l’Hôpital Montfort (ISM), Hôpital Montfort, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; and the Cancer Therapeutic Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute (OHRI), Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Guérin is with the Institut du savoir de l’Hôpital Montfort (ISM), Hôpital Montfort, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Speranzini is with School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Address author correspondence to Jennifer Brunet at jennifer.brunet@uottawa.ca.
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