Barriers and Levels of Physical Activity in Patients With Symptomatic Peripheral Artery Disease: Comparison Between Women and Men

in Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
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This cross-sectional study compared physical activity levels and barriers between 212 men and women with symptomatic peripheral artery disease. Physical activity was objectively measured by an accelerometer. Barriers to physical activity were obtained using a validated questionnaire. Women reported higher amounts of light physical activity (p < .001) and lower moderate–vigorous physical activity (p < .001) than men. Women more often reported barriers such as “not having anyone to accompany” (p = .006), “lack of money” (p = .018), “fear of falling or worsening the disease” (p = .010), “lack of security” (p = .015), “not having places to sit when feeling leg pain” (p = .021), and “difficulty in getting to a place to practice physical activity” (p = .015). In conclusion, women with symptomatic peripheral artery disease presented with lower amounts of moderate–vigorous activity and more barriers to activity than men. Strategies to minimize the barriers, including group actives and nonpainful exercises, are recommended for women with peripheral artery disease.

de Sousa, Correia, and Ritti-Dias are with the Universidade Nove de Julho, São Paulo, Brazil. Farah is with the Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, Pernambuco, Brazil. Saes, Zerati, Puech-Leao, and Wolosker are with the Hospital das Clínicas, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. Wolosker and Cucato are with Albert Einstein Israelite Hospital, São Paulo, Brazil.

Ritti-Dias (raphaelritti@gmail.com) is corresponding author.
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