Active Gaming: It Is Not Just for Young People

in Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
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Whether active gaming is an appropriate method to facilitate moderate-intensity physical activity in older adults remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the intensity of physical activity and enjoyment while playing three active video games in older adults compared with younger adults. Ten younger and 10 older adults played three active games on separate days. Participants played two 15-min periods per game: one period at a self-selected intensity and one period with structured instructions to maximize the movement. Physical activity intensity and enjoyment were measured during gameplay. The results indicated that older adults played games at significantly higher intensities (5.3 + 1.8 vs. 3.6 + 1.8 metabolic equivalents), spent less time in whole-body sedentary activity, and rated games more enjoyable compared with younger adults. With physical activity intensity being consistent with moderate-to-vigorous intensity for older adults during gameplay, the results suggest that active video games could be used as a cardiovascular tool for older adults.

Evans is with the Department of Health Sciences, School of Health & Human Sciences, Indiana University Purdue University, Indianapolis, IN, USA. K.E. Naugle, Owen, and K.M. Naugle are with the Department of Kinesiology, School of Health & Human Sciences, Indiana University Purdue University, Indianapolis, IN, USA.

Evans (ericevan@iu.edu) is corresponding author.
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