Frontal Asymmetry, Dispositional Affect, and Physical Activity in Older Adults

in Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
View More View Less
Restricted access

Purchase article

USD  $24.95

Student 1 year online subscription

USD  $79.00

1 year online subscription

USD  $105.00

Student 2 year online subscription

USD  $150.00

2 year online subscription

USD  $200.00

Physical activity has been consistently linked to better mental health—greater positive affect and life satisfaction, less negative affect, anxiety, and depression (Petruzzello et al., 1991; McAuley & Rudolph, 1995). Brain activation patterns have been linked to dispositional affect: greater relative left anterior hemisphere activation relates to positive affect, and greater relative right anterior activation relates to negative affect (Davidson, 1992). In this study, measures of resting EEG frontal asymmetry, dispositional affect, and physical activity were obtained from 41 older adults. Frontal asymmetry significantly predicted positive affect. In the high active group (n = 21), frontal asymmetry significantly predicted affective valence and satisfaction with life; in the low active group (n = 20), it significantly predicted negative affect. Physical activity was also significantly related to better dispositional affect. These findings suggest that the relationship between frontal brain activity and dispositional affect is influenced by physical activity in older adults.

Eric E. Hall and Steven J. Petruzzello are with the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Illinois, 906 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana, IL 61801.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 748 663 40
Full Text Views 8 3 0
PDF Downloads 7 3 0