Tai Chi Enhances Self-Efficacy and Exercise Behavior in Older Adults

in Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
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The article describes a randomized, controlled trial conducted to examine the effects of a Tai Chi intervention program on perceptions of personal efficacy and exercise behavior in older adults. The sample comprised 94 low-active, healthy participants (mean age = 72.8 years. SD = 5.1) randomly assigned to either an experimental (Tai Chi) group or a wait-list control group. The study length was 6 months, with self-efficacy responses (barrier, performance efficacies) assessed at baseline, at Week 12, and at termination (Week 24) of the study. Exercise attendance was recorded as an outcome measure of exercise behavior. Random-effects models revealed that participants in the experimental group experienced significant improvements in self-efficacy over the course of the intervention. Subsequent repeated-measures ANOVA revealed that participants’ changes in efficacy were associated with higher levels of program attendance. The findings suggest that self-efficacy can be enhanced through Tai Chi and that the changes in self-efficacy are likely to improve exercise adherence.

Li, Duncan, and Chaumeton are with the Oregon Research Institute, Eugene, OR 97403. McAuley is with the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801. Harmer is with the Department of Exercise Science at Willamette University, Salem, OR 97301.