The 2-Min Walk Test Detects Dual-Task Deficits in Individuals With Parkinson’s Disease

in Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
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The aim of this project was to (a) evaluate the potential of the 2-min walk test to detect declines in gait velocity under dual-task conditions and (b) compare gait velocity overground and on a self-paced treadmill in Parkinson’s disease (PD). In total, 23 individuals with PD completed the 2-min walk test under single- and dual-task (serial 7s) conditions overground and on a self-paced treadmill. There was a significant decrease in gait velocity from single- to dual-task conditions overground (1.32 ± 0.22 to 1.10 ± 0.25 m/s; p < .001) and on the self-paced treadmill (1.24 ± 0.21 to 1.05 ± 0.25 m/s; p < .001). Overground and treadmill velocities were not statistically different from each other; however, differences approached or exceeded the minimal clinical important difference. The 2-min walk test coupled with a cognitive task provides an effective model of identifying dual-task declines in individuals with PD. Further studies comparing overground and self-paced treadmill velocity is warranted in PD.

Rosenfeldt, Penko, Bazyk, Streicher, and Alberts are with the Department of Biomedical Engineering, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA. Dey is with the Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA. Alberts is also with the Center for Neurological Restoration, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA.

Alberts (albertj@ccf.org) is corresponding author.
Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
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