Effects of Eccentric-Focused Versus Conventional Training on Lower Limb Muscular Strength in Older Adults: A Systematic Review With Meta-Analysis

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Eccentric-focused training promotes greater gains in muscle strength compared with other types of training in adults. However, for older adults, these findings are still not well understood. A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed using manuscripts that performed eccentric-focused and conventional resistance training for at least 4 weeks and evaluated maximum muscle strength through tests of maximum repetitions in weight machine exercises (knee extension and leg press exercises). Five studies were included (n = 138). Increases in muscle strength were found in both resistance training groups, without a difference between them through meta-analysis. However, a large effect size has been observed only in eccentric-focused training. The findings suggest that resistance training protocols are similar for improving maximal strength in older adults, despite larger effect sizes for eccentric-focused training.

Molinari, Steffens, Rodrigues, and Dias are with the Laboratório de Pesquisa do Exercício, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil. Roncada and Rodrigues are with the Centro Universitário da Serra Gaúcha, Caxias do Sul, Brazil.

Molinari (t.molinari@hotmail.com) is corresponding author.
Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
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