An Examination of Hazing in Canadian Intercollegiate Sports

in Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology
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The overall purpose of the present study was to examine hazing among university athletes in Canada. More specifically, athletes’ experiences with hazing behaviors, knowledge regarding hazing, perceptions of the nature of hazing, attitudes toward hazing, and exposure to hazing policy and prevention/intervention strategies were investigated. A total of 434 U Sports (formerly known as Canadian Interuniversity Sport) athletes from various varsity-level and club-level sports participated in the study. Results showed that 58% of athletes experienced at least one hazing behavior. Some athletes reported that coaches were not only aware of hazing behaviors, but also present while hazing behaviors occurred. Athletes who experienced hazing perceived more positive outcomes of hazing than negative, and did not report hazing incidents because they believed experiencing hazing was part of being a member of the team. A small percentage of athletes had participated in hazing prevention workshops. Implications of these findings pertain to education on hazing, hazing prevention strategies and interventions.

Johnson and Signer-Kroeker are with the Faculty of Kinesiology and Recreation Management, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Guerrero and Holman are with the Faculty of Human Kinetics, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada. Chin is with the Dept. of Kinesiology, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA.

Address author correspondence to Jay Johnson at jay.johnson@umanitoba.ca.
Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology
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