Determining Individual Affect-Related Performance Zones (IAPZs): A Tutorial

in Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology

Click name to view affiliation

Michael B. JohnsonGeorgia Highlands College

Search for other papers by Michael B. Johnson in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
William A. EdmondsNova Southeastern University

Search for other papers by William A. Edmonds in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Akihito KamataFlorida State University

Search for other papers by Akihito Kamata in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Gershon TenenbaumFlorida State University

Search for other papers by Gershon Tenenbaum in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Restricted access

The purpose of this article is to present the procedural steps used to derive a person’s Individual Affect-Related Performance Zones (IAPZs). An IAPZ is that range of affect (i.e., arousal and pleasure) within which an individual has a probability of performing at a particular level (e.g., optimal, moderate, or poor). This methodology has been used in a number of research studies but has yet to be operationalized in the literature. The purpose of this procedure is to facilitate training programs designed to improve human performance in any number of domains via idiosyncratic control over affect. The methodology described consists of eight steps: (a) collecting data, (b) categorizing affect and performance level, (c) converting the data, (d) performing logistical ordinal regressions, (e) creating IAPZ curves, (f) creating IAPZ profile charts, (g) plotting within competition states onto IAPZ profile charts, and (h) utilizing IAPZs to select, implement, and evaluate performance enhancement strategies.

Michael Johnson is with the Division of Social Sciences at Georgia Highlands College in Rome, GA. E-mail: mbj.phd@gmail.com. William Edmonds is with the Applied Research Department at Nova Southeastern University in North Miami Beach, FL. Akihito Kamata and Gershon Tenenbaum are with the Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems at Florida State University in Tallahassee.

  • Collapse
  • Expand
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 1680 441 108
Full Text Views 4 3 1
PDF Downloads 3 2 0