A Model of Current Best Practice for Managing Concussion in University Athletes: The University of Toronto Approach

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Paul Comper University of Toronto

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Michael Hutchison University of Toronto

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Doug Richards University of Toronto

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Lynda Mainwaring University of Toronto

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Along with the ever growing awareness among the scientific community and the general public that concussion is a serious health care issue at all levels of sport, with potentially devastating long term health effects, the number of concussion surveillance clinical monitoring programs has significantly increased internationally over the past 10–15 years. An effective concussion program (a “best practice” model) is clinically prudent and evidence-based, one that is an interdisciplinary model involving health professionals who manage, educate, and provide psychosocial support to athletes. The integration of neuropsychological assessment is a component of many present day programs, and therefore, the neuropsychologist is an integral member of the concussion management team. The University of Toronto Concussion Program, operational since 1999, integrates best practices and current evidence into a working model of concussion management for university athletes. The model uses an interdisciplinary approach to monitor and assess athletes with concussions, as well as to educate its athletes, coaches, and administrators. A research component is also integral to the program.

The authors are with the Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario Canada.

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